Best Dispersed Camping in Colorado

Best Dispersed Camping in Colorado

At the Grizzly Rose, we pride ourselves on offering the best Country music the state of Colorado has to offer. But beyond our walls, the state has plenty to love, with most of them being natural wonders. And if you want to experience the natural beauty of Colorado fully, you need to go camping. Campsites are fine, but if you’re going to get to truly know Colorado while saving money, you should look into dispersed camping. Dispersed camping means taking on extra responsibility, but the rewards can be great. To help you get the most out of your experience, we’ve looked far and wide for some of the best dispersed camping areas in Colorado.

Bill Moore Lake

Bill Moore Lake Dispersed Camping

This Lake’s dispersed camping spots are some of the closest to Denver, but that doesn’t mean it’s the easiest to get to. You also need to bring a 4-wheel drive vehicle with decent clearance because the roads around this area can get pretty steep. People who make it to the lake in time to snag a spot will be rewarded with some truly breathtaking views. If you’ve got a Jeep or another 4X4 vehicle and you’re looking for a scenic drive, then you can use your campsite as a jumping off point for exploring the Empire Loop, a collection of trails that offers a lot of excitement and beautiful views without getting too tricky.

Highway 67 – Platte River

Platter River Dispersed Camping

This spot is a few miles farther away from Denver than Bill Moore Lake, but it’s a more leisurely drive. It’s well known to Denver residents who want to get to their dispersed camping site as quick as possible. This convenience is its biggest strength and weakness. Even though there are plenty of places to camp along Highway 67, it can get crowded quickly, especially during peak vacation times. If you want an isolated camping experience, you might want to look elsewhere, but if convenience is a priority, then this is a great place to be. Besides, even when there are lots of campers along the road, you don’t have to hike for long to find some peace and quiet. The nearby Platte River means that it’s also a convenient place for fishing, tubing, or just cooling off on a hot summer day.

Lost Lake Trail

Lost Lake Dispersed Camping Colorado

This spot is the place to be for anyone who wants a trip that combines hiking with camping. To begin with, if you’re going to camp here, you need to be ready to do a bit of hiking. To get here, you have to start at Hessie Trailhead, go down Thumb Trail $902, and turn south at Lost Lake Trail #813 to arrive at the lake. It’s almost 2 miles between Hessie and where the campsites on Lost Lake start, and you’ll have to carry anything you want at your campsite. You should also know to head out early, there are only eight designated spots you can camp at, and they can fill up quick during peak season. But if you’re looking for a campsite on a lake and easy access to some of the state’s best hiking, then a little hiking is a small price to pay.

Guenella Pass

Guenella Pass Dispersed Camping

If the “Mile High City” isn’t giving you the elevation you need then you can climb up even higher to camp at Guenella Pass. Just an hour from Denver down I-70 you’ll find a chance to camp amongst the clouds and bighorn sheep. Be aware that the roads are closed during the winter when the snow shuts down the pass. But from the End of may up through November, this is a great camping destination. Things can get windy on the pass, but when you look up at the night sky, you get a chance to see the stars the way they were meant to be seen. After a clear night on Guenella Pass, you’ll never look at the sky the same way again!

Montezuma Road

Montezuma Road Dispersed Camping

Two miles outside the town of Montezuma you can park along the Montezuma Road and enjoy camping during the summer months. Once upon a time, you could camp here all year long, but camping season is now limited to May through October. Still, this is plenty of time to enjoy the beautiful campsites here. The Snake River runs parallel to Montezuma Road, so no matter where you set up camp you shouldn’t be too far from the water. RVs can be brought, but the maximum length allowed is 25 feet. Anything larger has to be taken elsewhere. No matter where you camp you should be sure to clean up after yourself, but it’s especially important here. Camping here has been shut down because of bears attracted by food left by campers, so for the sake of yourself and others, you should always keep a tidy campsite.